Monday, February 24, 2020

Mill's Utilitarianism Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 500 words

Mill's Utilitarianism - Essay Example That is why he tries to show that justice and utility are able not only to coexist, but also cooperate. He points about that a fundamental part of justice is the desire to punish. Indeed, the former notion is often connected to various actions which might have a certain violent aspect, for example, a court ruling is basically a punishment for a person (50). So, he draws a connection between justice and some negative effects that it may have on people. Mill also suggests that justice might be perceived as a form of retaliation or vengeance that is applied to people who violates the rule and regulation which were created by the society (52). In other words, the social environment takes defensive actions in the form of justice in order to punish those how did not follow the conventions and thus became a treat to it. What is more important is that this desire to retaliate is seen by Mill as an essential constituent of a human being. Indeed, it is a part of our nature to hurt those who hurt us (55). He points out that this kind of attitude to others allows people to build a social environment that provided them with security. Nevertheless, in the case of justice this natural desire is conditioned by other characteristic features of a human being, such as intellect and sympathy (11). In other words, when violent actions addressed to those who hurt as go through the prism of intellect and sympathy, they become justice that is being applied to those who should be punished. Finally, the range of people who are likely to experience the consequences of justice is defined by Mill in the following way. On the one hand, this number includes those people who hurt a particular individual (50). For example, a person who commits robbery hurts another person and the latter perceives it is an act of injustice that was directed at him or her personally. In this case the

Saturday, February 8, 2020

Models of spirituality In accounting and business administration Essay

Models of spirituality In accounting and business administration - Essay Example This paper will discuss the need for spirituality in accounting and business administration by analyzing the book 'Landscapes of the Soul, a spirituality of place' and attempting to identify the author's underlying belief system and how this can be applied to business administration. The book 'Landscapes of the Soul, a spirituality of place' was written by Robert Hamma. In the book, Hamma describes spirituality as "an awareness of our relationship to God, ourselves, and others". The author goes on to state that these three dimensions are related integrally, and that "our relationship to God cannot exist apart from our sense of self and our relationship to others". Antonio de Mello once described spirituality as coming awake. Hamma's statements seem to be in harmony with this concept of a spiritual awakening, as he relates that most people, even though they don't know it, are asleep. They are born asleep, they live asleep, they marry asleep, they breed children in their sleep, and the y die in their sleep without ever waking up. They never understand the beauty and loveliness of this thing called human existence." The writer is of the opinion that when it comes to spirituality, "much of our attention is focused on the 'who' and 'how' of our experience". This quest to experience relational spirituality has resulted to a lot of emphasis being placed on spiritual relationships and practical spirituality. In relational spirituality, "psychology has been helpful in emphasizing the awareness that a healthy spirituality must be grounded in a healthy self image and grows within the context of life-affirming and nurturing relationships." (Hamma, Robert M. p. 19) This further reminds us that spirituality involves the caring that we give to other people around us, and that spirituality is not just only for our personal self-enrichment. Also, practical spirituality has led to a wonderful rediscovery of the rich tradition of prayer that is an integral nature of Christianity, and other spiritually practical religions. According to Hamma, The centering prayer movement, the rise of spiritual direction, and the interest in spiritual traditions like those of the Benedictines, the Carmelites, and the Jesuits are all evidence of this reality. This hunger for guidance in the practice of spirituality has also led many to discover eastern traditions like Zen and Taoism" (Hamma, Robert M. p. 19) This conversion to such eastern religions goes to show that for many, it does not matter what particular religion one follows, as long as there is a practical aspect of spirituality. Due to the amount of emphasis placed on having a spiritual experience, it is possible for the whole point of spirituality to fade away, and so, it is essential that we keep focus on why spirituality exists in our lives. Robert Hamma observes, "We do well to return to the tradition we have received, and rediscover there a rich understanding of the purpose of spiritual life, thereby recognizing that the spiritual life is not a matter of having spiritual experiences, but of cultivating a reverential stance toward God" (Hamma, Robert M. p. 20). Often times, spirituality and business might not seem to go along comfortably but a closer look will reveal that this relationship is actually a function of common sense. In business administration, it is evident that clients and customers tend to take their business elsewhere if they feel cheated or badly treated. If you try to manipulate your customers, they'll find somebody else to do business with. By inference, the writer's observations can lead a reader to the understanding that when we reflect on practical spirituality, we would come to the realization that life is indeed, a

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Global Warming Essay Example for Free

Global Warming Essay Global Warming is an issue that concerns almost everybody worldwide: it is the primary cause for the erratic and sometimes devastating weather that is experienced around the world. Global warming is causing the rise in sea level which in turn causes the flooding of coastal areas and areas with low elevation. Is global warming really happening today? Scientists with the United Nations Environmental Program (UNEP) believe it is so. It is indisputable that there has been a rise in the concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG) in the atmosphere during the last century, which scientists think may be one of the causes of global warming. II. Discussion A. Global Warming and doomsday Will global warming spell doom for our world? Scientists believe this to be so. Much depends on what actions we take now and in the coming years. Meteorologist Jagadish Shukla of the University of Maryland found out that deforestation would cause rainfall in the Amazon River to decline by more than 26 percent from the current 2. 5 m. to about 1. 8 m. a year. At the same time, the burning of fossil fuels, particularly coal and oil, produces sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides which are hazardous to the atmosphere. Findings show that a single smokestack may produce as much as 500 tons of sulfur dioxide a day. When these gases combine with oxygen and moisture, sulfuric acid and nitric acid is formed. The rain will carry the acids to the ground (acid rain) which may cause the depletion of calcium and magnesium in the soil, elements needed by plants for the formation of chlorophyll and wood, or it may cause the release of aluminum in the soil, which are poisonous and can kill the roots of trees (Carwardine, 2000). According to Dr. Sadik, UN population fund’s director, said that the more people increased pressure on already stressed lands, forests and water supplies. Other sources of climatic change were attributed to some forms of gases such as nitrous oxide, methane and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) (Cronin, 2001). Nitrous oxide or laughing gas is a colorless gas with a sweet taste and odor that is used as an anaesthetic in minor surgery that H2O is responsible for about 6 percent of the human contributes to greenhouse warming. Methane or cow gas, on the other hand, makes up about 18 percent of human contributions to greenhouse effect. Cattle, sheep, goats, and other cud-chewing animals give off methane, in burps and flatulence as they digest. CFCs was discovered by Thomas Widgley Jr. , a chemist working at the Frigidaire Division of General Motors, used as coolants in refrigerators and air conditioners and aerosol propellants in spray cans, medical sterilizers, cleaning solvents for electronic components and raw materials for making plastic foams such as coffee cups. CFCs are estimated to account for 14 percent of global warming. Experts said that what is happening right now is not a matter of adding a few degrees to the average temperature of a community. A rise of this magnitude may cause life, for without the environment, creatures on earth cannot survive (Davidson, 2003). B. Recommendations a. ) Recycling and Reuse of Solid Wastes Solid wastes are now viewed as a potential resource which must be recovered and reused whenever possible. Since disposal forest resources are rapidly being depleted, recycling solid wastes offer a solution to both. Consider the element phosphorus. Mined from phosphate ores, it is manufactured into fertilizers. It enters the plant tissues and we obtain it when we eat plant as vegetable. This is later excreted and joins the sewage system. The sewage system sludge can be used directly as fertilizer or soil conditioner. b. ) Conserving our Forests Every now and then we receive alarming news about our forests being denuded. Big logging concessionaires indiscriminately cut down trees without undertaking reforestation measures. III. Conclusion Of all issues affecting humanity, climate change is the most pervasive and truly global, posing a very real and serious threat to our environment. Climate change is the alteration of the pattern of global climate that may be due to human activity that alters the composition of the atmosphere. If present day emissions of greenhouse gases continue, it is estimated that the rate of increase in global mean temperatures will reach about 0. 3o C per decade. This will mean a likely increase of 1o C above the present level by the year 2025, and 3o C before the end of the next century. Reference: 1. Carwardine, Mark (2000). The WWF Environment Handbook. London: Macdonald Optima. Attractively illustrated handbook for the general reader. 2. Cronin, Helena (2001). The Ant and the Peacock: Altruism and Sexual Selection from Darwin to Today. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Chapters 2, 3, 4 (pp. 7-110). 3. Davidson, Joan (2003). How Green is your City? Pioneering Approaches to Environmental Action. London: Bedford Square Press. Guide to community action for urban renewal.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

The Role of Power in Obedience Essay -- Political Science Law Politics

To Obey or Disobey: The Role of Power in Obedience People’s decision to obey or disobey the law is based on how much power (in its various forms) they perceive the law to have behind it. The power of coercion is one maintained by every government in human history: the power to punish. The power of legitimacy is a much more subtle power: the power to appear as an authority and let others presume that you know best. While enforcing law, authorities will exercise both these powers. Both powers underscore government and society’s ability to control us and to get us to obey. Why do we obey? Stanley Milgram’s Obedience to Authority, a series of experiments in which subjects were told to administer what they believed to be high-voltage electric shocks to people who they thought were experimental subjects, shows us the disturbing extent of people’s obedience in the face of power. Whereas it was hypothesized that few of the subjects would actually shock their supposed experimental subjects, the actual experiments showed a â€Å"disturbingly high level of compliance with authority figures despite the apparent pain evinced by the false experimental subjects.† (Cover 223) Even when the false experimental subjects (actually just a tape recording of responses) screamed with supposed agony, the vast majority of the subjects, although showing some hesitation and concern for their â€Å"victims†, still nevertheless shocked them again and again at the behest of the authority, even after the â€Å"victims† had gone silent. (Cover 223) The almost blind obedience of these subjects was due to the power of legitimacy and expertise they perceived the authority figures behind the experiment to have. The 2 authorities were able to impose their will ... ...human, we will always retain our freedom of thought and our decision to obey or disobey. 5 Works Cited Cover, Robert M. â€Å"The Violence of Legal Acts.† Before the Law: An Introduction to the Legal Process. Eds. Bonsignore, Katsh, d’Errico, Pipkin, Arons, Rifkin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002. 223. King, Martin Luther. â€Å"Letter from Birmingham Jail.† Before the Law: An Introduction to the Legal Process. Eds. Bonsignore, Katsh, d’Errico, Pipkin, Arons, Rifkin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002. 158-162. Kropotkin, Peter. â€Å"Law and Authority.† Before the Law: An Introduction to the Legal Process. Eds. Bonsignore, Katsh, d’Errico, Pipkin, Arons, Rifkin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002. 158-162. Tyler, Tom. â€Å"Why do People Obey the Law?† Introduction to Legal Studies: A Reader. Ed. Thomas Hilbink. Amherst: Collective Copies. 475-495. The Role of Power in Obedience Essay -- Political Science Law Politics To Obey or Disobey: The Role of Power in Obedience People’s decision to obey or disobey the law is based on how much power (in its various forms) they perceive the law to have behind it. The power of coercion is one maintained by every government in human history: the power to punish. The power of legitimacy is a much more subtle power: the power to appear as an authority and let others presume that you know best. While enforcing law, authorities will exercise both these powers. Both powers underscore government and society’s ability to control us and to get us to obey. Why do we obey? Stanley Milgram’s Obedience to Authority, a series of experiments in which subjects were told to administer what they believed to be high-voltage electric shocks to people who they thought were experimental subjects, shows us the disturbing extent of people’s obedience in the face of power. Whereas it was hypothesized that few of the subjects would actually shock their supposed experimental subjects, the actual experiments showed a â€Å"disturbingly high level of compliance with authority figures despite the apparent pain evinced by the false experimental subjects.† (Cover 223) Even when the false experimental subjects (actually just a tape recording of responses) screamed with supposed agony, the vast majority of the subjects, although showing some hesitation and concern for their â€Å"victims†, still nevertheless shocked them again and again at the behest of the authority, even after the â€Å"victims† had gone silent. (Cover 223) The almost blind obedience of these subjects was due to the power of legitimacy and expertise they perceived the authority figures behind the experiment to have. The 2 authorities were able to impose their will ... ...human, we will always retain our freedom of thought and our decision to obey or disobey. 5 Works Cited Cover, Robert M. â€Å"The Violence of Legal Acts.† Before the Law: An Introduction to the Legal Process. Eds. Bonsignore, Katsh, d’Errico, Pipkin, Arons, Rifkin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002. 223. King, Martin Luther. â€Å"Letter from Birmingham Jail.† Before the Law: An Introduction to the Legal Process. Eds. Bonsignore, Katsh, d’Errico, Pipkin, Arons, Rifkin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002. 158-162. Kropotkin, Peter. â€Å"Law and Authority.† Before the Law: An Introduction to the Legal Process. Eds. Bonsignore, Katsh, d’Errico, Pipkin, Arons, Rifkin. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2002. 158-162. Tyler, Tom. â€Å"Why do People Obey the Law?† Introduction to Legal Studies: A Reader. Ed. Thomas Hilbink. Amherst: Collective Copies. 475-495.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Analyzing The Theme Of Nature In Literary Devices English Literature Essay

The subject of nature is really of import to each of the texts to be discussed in this essay: The Fat Black Woman ‘s Poems by Grace Nichols ; Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller and Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys. In a sense, the fact that each work is created within a different literary genre to some extent dictates the indispensable differences amongst them. However, this essay sets out to analyze how, in add-on to comparing literary devices, nature is used as a different jussive mood in each of the selected texts. Throughout the drama, Willy escapes back into his memories and it is profoundly important, hence, that the countryside is allied to this: ‘I was driving along, you understand? And I was all right. I was even detecting the scenery. You can conceive of, me looking at scenery, on the route every hebdomad of my life. But it ‘s so beautiful up at that place, Linda, the trees are so thick, and the Sun is warm ‘[ 3 ]Loman both belongs in the state and out of it because he has merely used it, as he has used both things and people, to acquire in front. The fact that he has been unsuccessful is hence a treachery of his ain and a generic dream that is ne'er fulfilled nor justified, merely as the narrative he begins to state Linda, his married woman, ends non in revery on the idyllic, as it started, but on loss of control: ‘all of a sudden I ‘m traveling off the route! ‘[ 4 ]Miller uses nature, hence, as an emblem of Willy ‘s supplanting: ‘Many of Willy ‘s activities can be seen as extremely symbolic. He workss seeds merely as he workss false hopes: both will decease and ne'er come to fruition, mostly because the house has become excessively hemmed in by the metropolis. ‘[ 5 ]In add-on, a farther lost dream of Willy ‘s has been connected with nature, that of his brother, Ben ‘s, offer to fall in him and do his luck beyond the suburban life Willy has lived: ‘William, when I walked into the jungle, I was 17. When I walked out I was 21. And, by God, I was rich! ‘[ 6 ]For Willy, hence, nature has become a topographic point of lost hope where ‘the grass do n't turn any longer ‘[ 7 ]; it does non belong and nor does he: ‘A victim of both a hardhearted capitalist society and his ain ill-conceived dreams, Willy ‘s eventual self-destruction is presented with tragic dimensions. His beliefs may be misguided, but he stays true to them to the terminal. Although he has neither soc ietal nor rational stature, Willy has self-respect, and he strives to keep this as his life falls apart around him. ‘[ 8 ] Supplanting is besides a major characteristic of Jean Rhys ‘s novel, Wide Sargasso Sea. First published in 1966, it is a prequel to Charlotte Bronte ‘s Jane Eyre, foremost published in 1847. The fresh uses nature as a agency of developing the narration of Rochester ‘s first married woman, Bertha Mason, here known as Antoinette Cosway, a immature adult female who feels herself displaced following the liberation of the slaves who had worked on her household ‘s plantation. ‘The really word â€Å" topographic point † occurs many times in the novel ‘[ 9 ]and Antoinette seeks consolation in what she sees as an Eden garden, her former place, from which she is cast out: ‘A really of import early set piece is Antoinette ‘s description of the garden at Coulibri, where she was a kid, a garden which was likely based on Rhys ‘s memories of her female parent ‘s household estate at Geneva. It marks childhood as taking topographic po int in a damaged Eden. ‘[ 10 ]The description of the garden is therefore really of import to an apprehension of Antoinette and of the manner Rhys uses her connexion with nature to help her character and thematic development: Our garden was big and beautiful as that garden in the Bible – the tree of life grew at that place. But it had gone wild. The waies were overgrown and a odor of dead flowers assorted with the fresh life odor. Underneath the tree ferns, tall as forest tree ferns, the visible radiation was green. Orchids flourished out of range or for some ground non to be touched. One was serpentine looking, another like an octopus with long thin brown tentacles bare of foliages hanging from a distorted root. Twice a twelvemonth the octopus orchid flowered – so non an inch of tentacle showed. It was a bell-shaped mass of white, mauve, deep purples, fantastic to see. The aroma was really sweet and strong. I ne'er went near it.[ 11 ] The genitive pronoun with which this paragraph opens instantly establishes the duality of Antoinette ‘s state of affairs. This is her place, it should experience like hers but it does non. The ‘beauty ‘ she infers has a ambidextrous luxuriance because it has ‘gone wild ‘ , symbolic of a land which has lost control, albeit for a positive ground. The ‘living ‘ and the ‘dead ‘ mix and encroach upon one another, and there is a snake in the garden in the ‘snaky ‘ orchids. Furthermore, the ‘twisted root ‘ implies a deformation of what was meant to be, metaphorically repeating Antoinette ‘s supplanting. In add-on, this is non the lone illustration of topographic points looking resonant of temperament and/or state of affairs: ‘Places are highly alive in this novel: the menacing, exuberant garden at Coulibri, the cryptic bathing pool at Coulibri, sunset by the huts of the plantation workers, the route fr om the small town of Massacre up to Granbois, the sea and sky at sundown from the ajoupa or thatched shelter at Granbois, the bathing pools at Granbois ( the bubbly pool and the nutmeg pool ) the forest where Antoinette ‘s hubby wanders until he is lost, the route to Christophine ‘s place, the trees and bamboos around the house at Granbois. ‘[ 12 ]Here, Antoinette appears at the same time intoxicated and repelled by the ‘sweet and strong ‘ of the garden, which possibly says something about her similarly ambivalent attitude towards those around her and they to her: ‘The image we now have of Rhys and her heroines is that of a inactive, impotent, self-victimized schizotypal personality who, comfy with failure, wields her weakness like a arm — all every bit natural as being female. ‘[ 13 ]The presentation of nature at the ‘honeymoon house ‘ is likewise hard to put, looking to be one thing but really being another, but her form er place is ‘a sacred infinite where Antoinette hugs to herself the secret hidden in Coulibri ‘ .[ 14 ]It is, so, these secrets in isolation, echoed in the descriptions of Antoinette ‘s fatherland that make the representation of nature in Wide Sargasso Sea so clearly an jussive mood of the text: Equally long as Antoinette can retrieve and order the events of her memories into a temporal or causal sequence, make even an semblance of sequence and keep a mensural sense of infinite and clip, so she can keep her life and ego together. Her act of narrative becomes an act of avowal and coherence, a nod to the universe and its conventions, an effort to forestall herself from fade outing. When, in Part Three, Antoinette lies encaged in Thornfield Hall ‘s dark, cold loft, the togss that hold her to the world that the universe perceives as saneness eventually interrupt. These togss are the elements of conventional narrative: additive chronology, sequence, narratorial clarity, distance. She herself admits at this point that ‘time has no significance ‘ ; sequence disintegrates into a confusion of present and past and finally into a dream which narrates her hereafter.[ 15 ] This has been quoted at length because it addresses many of the literary devices that the novelist, as opposed to the dramatist or poet, can utilize to develop a subject. With respect to nature, it is used by Rhys, as suggested above, to make a temporal infinite for Antoinette that is symbolic of the individuality she has lost. The abandon which is infringing upon the Eden of the garden, subsequently to be wholly destroyed, is an illustration of the manner in which the novelist can utilize one strong image to take into another, both being resonant of the yesteryear. Indeed, once more as stated above, the act of stating the narrative creates the character in the head of the reader and the locations in which she is placed are connected to that, as is the temporal disruption which memory green goodss and which is frequently, as with Antoinette, declarative mood of her province of head. The evocation of nature as a turbulent and affectional presence adds to this, with the sea as the ulti mate semiotic of challenge, pandemonium and disruption. Grace Nichols ‘ 2nd aggregation of poetry, The Fat Black Woman ‘s Poems, published in 1984, besides uses nature to arouse a peculiar image. However, as this is poesy, the lingual and literary devices used are really different from either those of the dramatist and/or novelist. ‘Nichols grew up in Guyana ‘[ 16 ]but has made her life and calling in England, ‘she has lived and worked in Britain since 1977 ‘[ 17 ], and this cross-cultural jussive mood is really much evident in her work: ‘her poems often acknowledge the foreigner clime, geographics, and civilization of England ‘s metropoliss ‘[ 18 ]Within The Fat Black Woman ‘s Poems, Nichols seeks to arouse a different perceptual experience of beauty from that which is shown in white Western civilization: ‘Nichols besides deploys the fat black adult female as a powerful challenge to the dictatorship of Western impressions of female beauty ‘[ 19 ]and therefore ‘ engender a new heroine, a adult female who revises the aesthetic of female beauty. ‘[ 20 ]One of the techniques Nichols employs to make this is uniting nature with an facet of the physical ego, as here in ‘Thoughts floating through the fat black adult female ‘s caput while holding a full bubble bath ‘ : Steatopygous sky Steatopygous sea Steatopygous moving ridges Steatopygous me[ 21 ] The unfamiliar word, ‘steatopygous ‘ ( intending holding to the full rounded natess ) is repeated for accent and juxtaposed with images of nature so as to bring forth an emblem of the black adult female as stopping point to nature, her organic structure shaped like the sky, moving ridges and sea. Nichols is authorising black adult females in image by making this as she does by giving the black adult female her ain alone voice: ‘In doing the fat black adult female the speech production topic of many of these verse forms, Nichols signals her refusal to busy the topic ( erectile dysfunction ) place designated for the black adult female by history and to take a firm stand on more complex subjectivenesss. ‘[ 22 ]Nichols is besides concerned that the voice should look realistic and hence the natural images perform yet another map: ‘Like many Afro-Caribbean authors, Nichols infuses her poesy with the religious energy of the tradition of adult females before her , a tradition that has little written record. ‘[ 23 ] In another verse form from the aggregation, ‘Beauty ‘ , this reproduction of a different image of physical entreaty can besides be seen to be connected with nature: Beauty is a fat black adult female walking the Fieldss pressing a breezed hibiscus to her cheek while the Sun lights up her pess Beauty is a fat black adult female siting the moving ridges floating in happy limbo while the sea turns back to embrace her form[ 24 ] Again, the adult female is juxtaposed with nature, supplying a integrity between the character and her milieus which is both actual and metaphorical. Repeat is used one time more by the poet to underscore the connexion between the subject of the aggregation and beauty in abstract. Indeed, the word ‘Beauty ‘ , the merely capitalised word in the verse form, is set entirely on a line, as is ‘hibiscus ‘ , as if to emphasize its importance as an emblem or iconic of what Nichols says is an imperative i.e. that this is what beauty unambiguously is. There is a common embracing between the adult female and nature, she ‘pressing ‘ the ‘hibiscus/to her cheek ‘ and ‘the sea bend [ ing ] back/to hug her form ‘ . It is as if Nichols is proposing that the ‘fat black adult female ‘ who is ‘riding the waves/drifting in happy limbo ‘ is in unison with nature and recognised by it as being so. All of nature, so, like â⠂¬Ëœthe Sun [ that ] lights up her pess ‘ is lauding her and she it. There is no punctuation in the poetries, underscoring the smooth, natural flow of the descriptions and the manner in which they are intended to connote all that is inherently natural. As Nichols writes in ‘The Assertion ‘ , ‘This is my birthright ‘[ 25 ]and therefore the probe of beauty within the verse forms becomes a socio-political jussive mood, excessively. In decision, all three texts – Miller ‘s Death of a Salesman, Rhys ‘s Wide Sargasso Sea and Nichols ‘ The Fat Black Woman ‘s Poems – all use nature as a manner of enlarging upon and more efficaciously showing their cardinal concerns. An of import component of this is the manner in which hapless false belief is used by the writers, i.e. nature reflecting and/or proposing a temper or subject. As the three texts discussed here are from different genres, they of class usage nature in different ways, using different literary devices, as has been shown. However, for each of the writers nature is singularly of import and enriches the single texts immeasurably. In the concluding analysis, hence, it might be suggested, so, that nature itself becomes about a communicative character within each of the really different plants discussed within this essay, as its importance to the creative activity and communicating of each can non be overestimated.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Essay On Social Media - 1377 Words

How do most people use social media networks? Some people use social media as a way to get in contact with friends and family. Some people use social media as a way to advertise businesses and events. Others use it as a means of entertainment and information. The Merriam-Webster dictionary states the definition of social media as â€Å"forms of electronic communication through which users create online communities to share information, ideas, personal messages, and other content† (Merriam-Webster, 2017). Whichever way people decide to use their social media account their personal information is shared one way or another. Any information on the internet can be used by anyone who has a desire to use it. Because of this abundant and immediate†¦show more content†¦So one may ask, how are these identity thieves stealing people’s identities and what are they doing with them? One vary common tactic is called â€Å"phishing†. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) defines â€Å"phishing† as the act of using someone else’s email claiming to be the true owner or claiming to be a business and asking the recipient for sensitive information such as passwords, credit card numbers, banking information, and/or a social security number (FBI IC3). This kind of work is done by skilled electronic hackers. They will find an email on someone’s social media profile and use an algorithmic method to create a password for the email. Once they do that then they have the ability to send information wherever they want using the victim’s personal email address. Not only can they use the email and identity to harm others, but also now have the ability to find out more information about the victim. Let’s say this hypothetical person has a Facebook account. Some of the information that people commonly put on their account is their full name, email address, date of birth, and the city they live in. The hacker has the ability to match the email address to the Facebook profile and have access to all of the personal information on it. After that they have the ability to look up other personal stuffShow MoreRelatedEssay On Social Media971 Words   |  4 PagesIn the World, today social media controls everything. Social media includes blogs, social games, chat apps, and photo sharing apps. â€Å"around 60 percent of the population has at least one social account† (Gordon). The generation of millennials have more than one social media account and are always on their phones checking those sites multiple times a day. 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It’s quite fascinating that in the early 2000’s social media wasn’t even invented; yet statistics show that Facebook has accumulated users surpassing the entire population of the United States. The acceleration of growth and progress in social media just gives us a glimpse of its maximum potential on how it will revolutionize and transform marketing. Before we further discuss the subject of social media, one must first know itsRead MoreEssay On Social Media1711 Words   |  7 PagesDiscussion Social media is defined as â€Å"websites and applications that enable users to create and share content or to participate in social networking.† (according to Google and oxford dictionary) This means that websites such as Gmail are also social media websites as well the more social media sites like Snapchat or Instagram. Social media websites have exploded in popularity over the last ten years due to advances in mobile phone technology and all this new technology allows us to connect and haveRead MoreEssay On Social Media1382 Words   |  6 Pageswhat is social media actually? Social media takes apart in the internet which is just a jumbled mess of networks. Social media consists of apps and websites all built on an electronic device whether a computer or a phone. Now social media makes it easy to communicate and be able to talk to others anywhere with a mobile connection. Also, it gives out new job roles and you can create accounts on sites to further put your life all over the internet. Not many people think of this, but we use social mediaRead MoreEssay On Social Media1029 Words   |  5 PagesOur society is being bombarded with social issues whether they are real or has been modified to fit the profile of the writer. How has the world of social media changed our views for better or for worse? Can our society recover and modify its viewpoints to show the reality of our world or are we going to keep going down this ideal view of what we perceive others should see? I have seen firsthand how something as simple as a viewpoint posted on social media has permanently changed someone’s life andRead MoreEssay On Social Media883 Words   |  4 Pagesavailable to everyone, the comments will contain bias and not accurate. The title of the page is â€Å"How the social media shaping teenagers’ communication skills†, the comments should be around 200 words about their experience of social media and how the use of social media affect their c ommunication with others. It is a good platform to let teenagers to express their perspectives toward social media, the opinions are important in my research. Therefore, for attracting people I will offer $10 StarbucksRead MoreSocial Media Essay892 Words   |  4 Pagesby customer. The solution of this problem is introducing a good social media to company where all employers and staffs will be connected, communication between them will be faster and work completes without delay. Therefore, we will like to recommend you Facebook as best social media for communication for business purpose. Summary and Evaluation Summary: There are various requirements of the business that suggested social media need to follow. The first one is it should send the message to the

Saturday, December 28, 2019

The Symbolism of the Conch Shell in Lord of the Flies by...

The Symbolism of the Conch In Lord of the Flies, several symbols are used to illustrate important ideas that are crucial to the plot and meaning of the book. One of these symbols is the conch: this rare shell is not only a precious and expensive in the world of merchandise; it also holds a dark and mysterious power over a group of English boys, lost on an island with no adults, clues, or means of escape. The boys set up a civilization and try to live in the society they have set up. This system works for a while, aided by the power of the conch. However, as the story advances, the civilized way of life that the boys have set up starts falling apart, and savagery starts luring certain boys outside of the safe and rational walls of†¦show more content†¦The conch is gone (181) [†¦]† So their token of power, their last little bit of significance, has been shattered to pieces, and washed away by the cleansing waves of the sea. When the conch is destroyed, it is a clear sign that all civilization has disappeared and disintegrated. This is shown to the extent that a person – Piggy – is killed, or rather, murdered. Symbolically, the shell is destroyed at the same time that Piggy dies: these two were basically all of the order, rational thinking, structure and civilization that were present on the island, and they are both lost at once, by the very hands of the savages. The conch also represented purity and innocence, and the humanity in the boys: both the conch, and humanity, are fragile and pure: â€Å"The conch lay at Ralph’s feet, fragile and white (171).† This important of the boys lives on the island â€Å"exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist (181)†, and along with it went everything it represented. The conch, therefore, is a powerful and mysterious object in this novel that represents purity, innocence, order, unity, and everything that is good, everything that crumbles and disintegrates as the once-civilized boys turn to savages. The conch, symbol of hope, is shattered, and its destruction brings about the destruction of the boys’ very essence, of their love, of their compassion, of their humanity. The conch, a powerful and important object on a number of levels, plays an important role in Lord ofShow MoreRelatedWilliam Goldings Lord of the Flies Essay1255 Words   |  6 Pagesever since they were born, or would they disregard all of it and do as they please because there is no definite authority figure to tell them how to live. In William Goldings, The Lord of the Flies, he brilliantly tells a story of life and death and everything in between. His use of symbolism with the conch, beast, and lord of the flies is phenomenal. It is a story that makes you think. Every person, when faced with reality, may act civil now, but in a survival situation, human nature takes overRead MoreWilliam Golding s Lord Of The Flies 1299 Words   |  6 PagesKanak Garg Mr. Fraser English 10 Honors, Period 6 19 December 2014 Savagery in Civilization: Symbolism in Lord of the Flies Symbolism as defined by the Merriam Webster Dictionary, is â€Å"the use of symbols to express or represent ideas or qualities in literature, art, etc.† (â€Å"Symbolism†). For this reason, symbolism is utilized in literature in order to make novels more interesting and convey notions that are usually either highly controversial or extremely philosophical. For example in the popularRead MoreEssay On The Conch Shell In Lord Of The Flies946 Words   |  4 PagesSymbolism Essay Some actions made my individuals not only has an effect on the people around them, but the objects close by as well. This important object or sign, can all be based upon the people using it, and also be in relation to its environment and surroundings. In the novel, The Lord of the Flies, the author, William Golding uses a conch shell to represent different meanings throughout his novel. The message in each of the different meanings of the conch, show how a group of young, BritishRead MoreEssay about The Conch in William Goldings Lord of the Flies1532 Words   |  7 PagesThe Conch in William Goldings Lord of the Flies In William Goldings novel â€Å"Lord of the Flies† he uses a lot of symbolism. The entire book is microcosm to the real world, as the novel is set at the time when World War II was going on and on the island there is a hunt at the end of the book symbolic of the war. A symbol Golding uses throughout the book is the conch. It represents authority and order. The person holding the conch had the power, and it created orderRead MoreThe Symbolism Of The Conch958 Words   |  4 PagesSwaninger Period 1 1 May 2017 The Symbolism of the Conch For centuries philosophers, have debated the question of whether man is naturally evil. William Golding poses this question in his novel Lord of the Flies. Set on a tropical island during World War II, the novel begins when schoolboys from Great Britain are being flown to safety and their plane is shot down. No adults survive, and the boys are left to control themselves and get rescued. The boys find a conch, which is a symbol of power and authorityRead MoreEssay on Symbolism in Lord of the Flies, by William Golding912 Words   |  4 PagesSymbolism in Lord of the Flies, by William Golding In his classic novel, Lord of the Flies, William Golding uses many elements of symbolism to help the readers gain a greater understanding of his message. Symbolism can be anything, a person, place, or thing, used to portray something beyond its self. It is used to represent or foreshadow the conclusion of the story. As one reads this novel, he or she will begin to recognize the way basic civilization is slowly stripped away from the boys as conflictRead MoreLord Of The Flies : Symbolism1012 Words   |  5 PagesBabatunde Carter (Jnr) English 102-0501 Mrs. Geneva Cannon 16th, November , 2015 Lord of the flies : The Symbolism of the Conch For Centuries philosophers and scholars have bantered about the topic of whether man is naturally fiendish. William Golding offers this conversation starter in his sensible novel â€Å"Lord of the Flies†. Set on a tropical island amid World War II, the novel starts when school boys from Incredible England are being traveled to well being and their plane is shotRead MoreSymbolism And Symbolism In Lord Of The Flies By William Golding892 Words   |  4 Pageswhole story. Throughout the novel, author William Golding includes symbolism that hints at irony, foreshadowing, and a variety of themes. These symbols contribute to the depth and meaning of the story, allowing the characters to act under their influence. In Lord of the Flies, there is a numerous amount of symbols, such as the signal fire, the conch, and the ritual. The signal fire possesses many symbolic meanings essential to the story, Lord of the Flies. In the beginning of the novel, Ralph startedRead MoreLord Of The Flies By William Golding1212 Words   |  5 Pagesthis is just what happens in William Golding’s Lord of the Flies. This piece of literature is used by the author to describe the very real society of human beings, through the eyes of young, â€Å"innocent† children. There is savagery, evil, goodness at heart, and the sense of hope, whether being lost or discovered, in this book. In Lord of the Flies, there are multiple different symbols that Golding uses to show the fall of society. Two of them being the beautiful conch shell, and the hopeful signal fireRead More Lord Of The Flies Essays655 Words   |  3 Pages Symbols Imagine a bunch of young childrens lives changed by being trapped on a island with no civilization around. William Golding shows how terrifying it can be in Lord Of The Flies, the novel that brings symbolism above all to the emotions of all that read it. The symbols that bring out the meaning the best are the leadership skills, the fire and the conch. First, are the leadership skills, as are shown in the book, Ralph has. Ralph in the novel has many ideas, leadership skills, and has the